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Time Just Slipped Ahead A Bit

Roku Slams Another Nail In The Coffin Of Broadcasting

By Bruce A Johnson | November 25, 2009

It was over a year ago when I reviewed the Roku Netflix player. A few months later, Roku added access to the Amazon streaming-rental service, and in the middle of last summer Major League Baseball showed up as a channel on the Roku. I love it when early-adoption is rewarded like this, because it so rarely is. Look for the pioneers by the arrows in their backs, or so it is said. I consider the Roku the best $99 I ever spent at Amazon, hands down. But far beyond being a great way to catch up on "30 Rock" episodes, the Roku is becoming something much, much more.

I confess it: I'm a geek. And in the halcyon days between the turn of the century and 2004, I was addicted to TechTV. Leo LaPorte is, in my view, the best pure tech communicator of our time, able to seamlessly bridge the yawning chasm between the newbies and the power users. I managed to have TechTV it routed into my office at work expressly to watch "Call For Help" in the afternoons - it was almost like geek grad school. I learned more about Photoshop in Leo's five-minute segments with Bert Monroy than in any of the several CompuMaster classes I have attended. And of course, "The Screen Savers" with Leo and Patrick Norton was geek heaven. Of course, money rules the roost, and apparently Paul Allen needed more of it than TechTV was providing. His Vulcan Ventures decided to sell TechTV to Comcast, who then folded it into G4, where it disappeared not long after.

Leo LaPorte and his TechTV colleagues didn't take this lying down, of course. Leo started the TWiT network (TWiT stands for "This Week In Tech"), which grew from a weekly audio podcast to an actual multi-camera video production over the last four years, and has added about a dozen other programs as well. Another "Screen Savers" regular, Kevin Rose, went on to co-found the Digg website, and is one of the principles in another online video venture called Revision3 (which, coincidentally, now employs Patrick Norton as a host on several programs.) And the aforementioned Bert Monroy hosts a Photoshop-themed show on Revision3 as well.

Why am I blathering about this?

Well, tonight I updated my Roku box, and guess what appeared on my TV set? Real, legitimate Internet broadcasting, in the form of the TWiT network, Revision3, Blip.tv, a Flickr channel, Pandora radio, and others - all looking and sounding pretty good on a 40" LCD. (And I have a severely lame 3-megabit-on-a-good-day AT&T DSL connection.) So, in effect, I got my TechTV back, albeit in a much more fragmented way. It remains to be seen if any of this can pay for itself, of course, but for now I'm a pretty happy geek. And I can see my already-constrained broadcast television viewing time getting even smaller - and even though I have to work in the morning, it's cruising up on 1AM here in the Midwest and I'm sitting here watching Tekzilla, a Revision3 program that is a fine successor to "The Screen Savers."

One more thing - if Leo and his pals can do this...why can't we?

Interesting times. (PS: The same Comcast cable system that bought and then buried TechTV is now in talks to buy a large share in - of all things - NBC. Stay tuned, kids.)

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Comments

MichaelSanders: | November, 25, 2009

Depends how you define broadcasting.  Are you talking about the technical concept of RF broadcasting or are you talking about the concept of one to many transmission.  If its the latter then we you’ve sort of shot yourself in the foot.  You are just looking at another channel via another transmission format.  Its still one to many.

However, with the exception of the NFL channel the jury is still out on how these channels will perform financially.  Over in the UK, small channels are going by the wayside on almost daily basis.  All they have done is succeed in forcing down ad rates across the industry.  Of course the economics are different over in the US.  But what is happening is it is also reducing programme making budgets.

The fact that Comcast are looking at buying part or all of NBC is an indicator that they think that a) there’s still life in the old broadcasting dog and b) that (and here’s the real point) its all about content.

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