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Ease and Wizz

Alternative keyframe interpolations for After Effects.

By Chris and Trish Meyer | December 03, 2008

Virtually all After Effects users take advantage of the Easy Ease keyframe assistants. Applying them makes your animations elegantly speed up and slow down. But there are alternatives, right?There are. Switching a keyframe's interpolation to Auto Bezier, for example, will give half the ease of Easy Ease. You can also edit the keyframe interpolation handles in the Graph Editor, or Option (Alt) + double-click a keyframe outside of the Graph Editor to open the Keyframe Velocity dialog, where you can numerically dial in the ease amount.Beyond these Bezier interpolations are a set of interpolation behaviors originally written by Robert Penner for Flash users, based on other mathematical formula such as sine or exponential curves. Ian Haigh has adapted these for use inside After Effects by writing a series of scripts that apply the equivalent expressions to After Effects keyframes. The package is called Ease and Wizz, and is available for free (although donations are appreciated). Read More

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Final Cut Help - Animating Text with Keyframes

Final Cut Help - Animating Text with Keyframes

Learn to animate Text in Motion

By Richard Harrington | December 02, 2008

Join Apple Certified Trainer Mason Dixon as he shows you how to animate text with keyframes in Motion. Read More

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Awesome Adobe Motion Graphics Research Project

Please put this in After Effects immediately

By Matthew Jeppsen | December 01, 2008

An Adobe engineer posted a demonstration of a sweet little research project recently. It's a simple, consumer-oriented method of accomplishing complex motion graphics tasks. Here's hoping we'll see it soon in their products! Video below... Read More

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Nikon’s Top DSLR Is No Video Camera

Bucking a trend set by the D90 and the Canon 5D MKII

By Scott Gentry | December 01, 2008

Why write about a DSLR on a pro video site? With the Canon 5D MKII all the rage, as well as the fervor mounting over the new RED cameras, it's almost surprising that the new top of the line Nikon isn't touting video as a prowess. This camera is no slouch by any means. It sports a full frame sensor and lots of Nikon love. Check out the camera, more images, and the press release on our sister site, ProPhoto Coallition. Newly developed Nikon FX-format CMOS sensor (35.9 x 24.0 mm sensing area) 24.5 million effective pixels Superior-resolution image quality equivalent to medium-format digital cameras High-speed continuous shooting of up to approx. 5 frames per second in FX format (24.5 megapixels) / 5:4 (20.4 megapixels); 7 frames per second in DX format (10.5megapixels)*1 Wide ISO sensitivity of 100 to 1600 at normal setting, with low noise performance Two Live View modes - Handheld and Tripod High-density 51-point (world's largest number*2) AF system Read More

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Animating a Sky Part 2 - Photoshop for Video

Animating a Sky Part 2 - Photoshop for Video

Creating Moving Footage with Phtoshop and After Effects

By Richard Harrington | November 30, 2008

Instructor Richard Harrington shows you how to add an animated sky to your still photos using Photoshop and After Effects. Part 2 of 2. Read More

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1080p camera canon cmos dslr nikon rolling shutter skew test video

CMOS sensors are tastier without Jello

The Canon 5D MKII doesn't appear to suffer from excess rolling shutter skew

By Matthew Jeppsen | November 30, 2008

We've already seen some excellent video footage from the new Canon 5D MarkII DSLR camera. However, I've not really seen the sort of test footage that reveals CMOS wobble (the jello effect) or rolling shutter skew. While this isn't a perfect test, I was encouraged to see a lot of motion in the following video shot on the streets of Beijing. It appears, anecdotally at least, that the 5D samples from it's sensor much faster than the ultra-wobbly Nikon D90, and the camera sure looks like it would handle most situations with aplomb. Video embedded below. Read More

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How to Edit Canon 5D Footage in FCP

Using freeware tools to prep Mark II HD footage for FCP

By Matthew Jeppsen | November 29, 2008

Canon's new 5D Mark II DSLR with 1080p video mojo has been showing up in the hands of new users for the past few days, and the footage is hitting Vimeo faster than you can say "What's a Scarlet?" One of the most pressing questions by Mac users is how to edit the compressed HD footage, which is captured as Quicktime H.264 files at 38.6 Mbits/sec. Reports suggest that FCP can edit the footage natively, but playback is likely to be choppy. That being the case, FCP users are recommending transcoding the footage into ProRes 422, for realtime playback and editing. ProRes is several times the bitrate of the MPEG-4 source files, but it should solve the playback issues.An alert reader dropped me a Tweet this evening however, and he's got a great workflow idea for those that can't justify the additional disk space that ProRes transcoding requires. His workflow uses the free cross-platform MPEG Streamclip app to transcode the source files into the 35 Mbits/sec XDCAM EX codec, which can then be played back and edited in realtime in FCP. A tutorial video is embedded below... Read More

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canon dslr marketing video

Vincent Laforet posted another Canon 5D MK2 video

Canon's accidental viral marketing genius continues selling DSLRs

By Matthew Jeppsen | November 27, 2008

If this guy isn't on Canon's marketing payroll, they need a wake up call. I imagine that he's done more to sell the new Canon 5D MarkII than any other entity out there, including Canon. Read More

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Liberating segregated HDTV sets

Liberating segregated HDTV sets

Unfortunately, many of the latest-generation HDTV sets sold in the USA are segregated, but we can liberate them partially...

By Allan Tépper | November 27, 2008

Unfortunately, many of the latest-generation HDTV sets sold in the USA are segregated, meaning that they cruelly block 50Hz signals on their video input. In some cases, they simply show no picture, while in others, they put up an unfriendly message stating: "Unsupported format". However, as I explained in my recent comparative article on HD players, both AppleTV and WDTV fortunately liberate these segregated HDTV sets so that they can play 50Hz material (25p, 50p, or 50i) with no problem, along with ±60Hz material. My comment here regarding segregated HDTV sets refers to distribution, since for professional production and post-production, I highly recommend the use of professional HD monitors. So far, all of the professional HD monitors I have used personally or have researched are all free of segregation nonsense and play all desired signals. Read More

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cinealta dcs digital cinema society ex3 f35 fcpug macfilmmakers macworld mfm supermeet

Events: DCS & MFM discuss CineAlta; FCPUG SuperMeet; Broadcast Video Expo

Three months, three events, in the SF Bay Area and London.

By Adam Wilt | November 27, 2008

Get out, meet people, see cool things, and learn stuff. December: Learn about CineAlta cameras and different recording gammas in Cupertino. January: party with the FCP faithful at MacWorld Expo in San Francisco. February: the UK's own miniature version of IBC takes place at Earl's Court in London. Be there, or may your pixels be ever non-square. Read More

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Liberating segregated HDTV sets

Liberating segregated HDTV sets

Unfortunately, many of the latest-generation HDTV sets sold in the USA are segregated, but we can liberate them partially...

By Allan Tépper | November 26, 2008

Unfortunately, many of the latest-generation HDTV sets sold in the USA are segregated, meaning that they cruelly block 50Hz signals on their video input. In some cases, they simply show no picture, while in others, they put up an unfriendly message stating: "Unsupported format". However, as I explained in my recent comparative article on HD players, both AppleTV and WDTV fortunately liberate these segregated HDTV sets so that they can play 50Hz material (25p, 50p, or 50i) with no problem, along with ±60Hz material. My comment here regarding segregated HDTV sets refers to distribution, since for professional production and post-production, I highly recommend the use of professional HD monitors. So far, all of the professional HD monitors I have used personally or have researched are all free of segregation nonsense and play all desired signals.The rest of this article has been moved to Allan's PVC channel. Click here to view it. Read More

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Beautiful CG work in a Porsche Spec Spot

Evoking emotion with computer graphics

By Matthew Jeppsen | November 26, 2008

Porsche Speed from Daan Pol on Vimeo.

This spec spot by I ran across on Vimeo simply has to be seen. It took 4 months to render out the final composite... Read More

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Red Renders Previous Koolaid Vouchers Obsolete

Constant change can be a bug, not a feature

By Matthew Jeppsen | November 25, 2008

The latest non-news on the Red Digital Cinema front is Jim Jannard's coy announcement of yet another announcement date for their latest announcement. This one will be December 3rd. Predictably, the tagline reads "Everything has changed..."Well at least they are honest about it. At least people know what they are getting into when they plunk down cash months (or arguably years) in advance of product delivery to finance a concept in development. At least Red admits they can and will change specifications and targets, based on their whims and sense of the market, and not necessarily what their customers have requested. At least Red One owners are aware of the fact that their camera system will be left unfinished, frequently buggy, and still a moving development target for years. It's hard for me to be frustrated when I've poured my own tall glass of Red-flavored koolaid, and knew exactly what I was doing all along... Read More

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Double Your iPhone Battery

Double Your iPhone Battery

Long days in the field... phone keeps going

By Richard Harrington | November 23, 2008

I know some of you hate iPhone posts (sorry)....But here's something I just had to gush about.... The mophie Juice Pack iPhone battery is shipping. I had the original battery pack, but with the new form-factor for the 3G phones, I had to upgrade. Here's the specs: * Standby Time - Up to 350 hours * Talk Time - 6 additional hours on 3G | 12 hours on 2G * Internet Use - 6 additional hours on 3G | 7 hours on Wi-Fi * Audio Playback - 28 additional hours * Video Playback - 8 additional hoursThis device is absolutely awesome and lets me get through a long day of business. Read More

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The 24 fps Prayer

It's a religious issue...

By Adam Wilt | November 23, 2008

We at Meets The Eye have been discussing frame rates today, triggered by the article at http://www.projectorcentral.com/judder_24p.htm We'd .like to use frame rate as a creative control, not as overcranking or undercranking, but as a presentation tool to affect mood and perception. None of us are particularly enamored of 24 fps, and Tim Blackmore was feeling frustrated enough by it and its persistence as a baseline for production and distribution that he composed the following:

Our Frame Rate, who art in heaven,hallowed be thy cadence.Though new display technology come,thy blur be done,on LCDs as it is on PlasmasGive us this day our daily motion sickness.And forgive us our disgust,as we forgive those who use slow frame rates to spite us.And lead us not into 2:3 pulldown,but deliver unto us both HD and 4K.For thine is the look, the feel and the tired old standard.for ever and ever. Amen.

You might disagree, but then, that often happens with religious issues...(Oh, and it's © 2008 by Tim Blackmore. Pass it on, but give the guy credit if you do!) Read More

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Lighting Advice for Budding DPs

Wherein I realize I'm finally wise enough to give lighting advice to others

By Art Adams | November 21, 2008

Not long ago a student asked me a question that on its surface seemed very simple: "How do DPs approach lighting a set?" Read More

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TRULY native Red support in Final Cut Studio…finally!

TRULY native Red support in Final Cut Studio…finally!

Well, rewrappered QTs - as native as P2 is...

By Mike Curtis | November 21, 2008

Apple and Red have teamed up to support native (OK, rewrapped QTs, akin to how P2 is handled) .R3D support in Final Cut Pro 6.0.5 and Color 1.0.3. Red has a plugin to work with those new versions, including access to the 12 bit RGB data within Color...even letting you manipulate exposure, white balance, etc. on the native R3Ds in a 32 bit floating point space. Keep reading for either:a.) to understand WTH all that means, orb.) all the gory details if you do....after the jump. Read More

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AppleTV, WDTV, or Blu-ray: Which one is best to distribute your HD project?

AppleTV, WDTV, or Blu-ray: Which one is best to distribute your HD project?

Even if your HD project isn't destined to be shown over the air, you'll still want your client be able to play it on an HDTV set

By Allan Tépper | November 21, 2008

Even if your HD project isn't destined to be broadcast over the air, you'll still want to have your client be able to play it on an HDTV set, not just on a computer. The good news is that you have several options to make that happen, including Blu-ray, AppleTV, and the brand-new WDTV device from Western Digital. During this transitional period, it is often the producer who influences the client as to which HD player to acquire. Many producers even incorporate the cost of one of these HD players in the project price and then give the device to the client "as a gift" with the first HD project, if the client doesn't already own any HD player. It's great to have options, but you must understand them fully (both their strengths and weaknesses) in order to pick one, two of them, or all of them, depending upon the exact format of HD you have produced, the hardware you own (or are willing to buy), the type of client, and the type of delivery. This article will help you learn the details that will help you make the appropriate decision. Read More

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AppleTV, WDTV, or Blu-ray: Which one is best to distribute your HD project?

AppleTV, WDTV, or Blu-ray: Which one is best to distribute your HD project?

Even if your HD project isn't destined to be shown over the air, you'll still want your client be able to play it on an HDTV set

By Allan Tépper | November 20, 2008

Even if your HD project isn't destined to be broadcast over the air, you'll still want to have your client be able to play it on an HDTV set, not just on a computer. The good news is that you have several options to make that happen, including Blu-ray, AppleTV, and the brand-new WDTV device from Western Digital. During this transitional period, it is often the producer who influences the client as to which HD player to acquire. Many producers even incorporate the cost of one of these HD players in the project price and then give the device to the client "as a gift" with the first HD project, if the client doesn't already own any HD player. It's great to have options, but you must understand them fully (both their strengths and weaknesses) in order to pick one, two of them, or all of them, depending upon the exact format of HD you have produced, the hardware you own (or are willing to buy), the type of client, and the type of delivery. This article will help you learn the details that will help you make the appropriate decision.The rest of this article has been moved to Allan's PVC channel. Click here to view it. Read More

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Animating a Sky Part 1 - Photoshop for Video

Animating a Sky Part 1 - Photoshop for Video

Combining PS and AE to make videos from photos

By Richard Harrington | November 20, 2008

Instructor Richard Harrington shows you how to add an animated sky to your still photos using Photoshop and After Effects. Part 1 of 2. Read More

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